I think the purpose of thinking holistically isn’t to be fancy; it’s to look for opportunities as to how we can help our patients the most within their environment

I remember seeing a 15 year old patient not long ago, now. He came in after developing pain, heat and swelling around his right ankle after a run. This shouldn’t have happened. A 15 year old? He should be in the shape of his life; thus far anyway

On examination it was pretty clear that this wasn’t a form or arthritis or a sprain, it was a fracture. Once again this shouldn’t be happening.

I instructed him to go to hospital and asked if I could have a quick word with his mum, who disclosed that her son had unfortunately been suffering from anorexia. This leads to malnutrition and a resultant weakening of the bones, thus making fractures more common.

I apologised to him that he hadn’t felt more comfortable explaining his situation to me but the whole situation further emphasised to me that we aren’t treating injuries, we’re treating people. It is important to be holistic to enable us to learn where our patients want to be and what opportunities are there for their recovery

This patient, for example, needed immediate treatment for his foot… but later on would ideally benefit from Nutritional Coaching

I hope this story has shed light on how we at the clinic treat our patients. If you need further advice or information, you know where we are

Just contact us to ask for a free consultation

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